Math Antics – What Are Percentages?


Hi! Welcome to Math Antics. Now that you know all about fractions, from watching all of our fractions videos, it’s time to learn about something called “percentages”. Percentages are super important. Have you ever been in a math class and heard another student ask the teacher: Um.. excuse me… teacher… Ah… when are we ever gonna use this stuff? Ya know… like in real life? Well when it comes to percentages, the answer is one-hundred percent of the time. Well alright… maybe not a hundred percent of the time… but a lot! Percentages are used every day to calculate things like: …how much sales tax you pay when you buy something. …how much something costs when it’s on sale. …how much fiber is in your granola bar. …or how much money you can make if you invest it in the stock market. That’s all real life stuff for sure. So, you can see that it’s really important to understand percentages and how we use them in math. Alright then… are you ready to learn the key to understanding percentages, or percents as they’re called for short? Drum roll please… A percent is a fraction! Whaaaat? That’s right… a percent IS a fraction! And since you already know all about fractions, learning about percents is gonna be easy. But a percent isn’t just any old fraction. A percent is a special fraction that always has 100 as the bottom number. If it’s a percent, then no matter what the top number is, the bottom number will be 100. In fact, because the bottom number of a percent is always 100, we don’t even write it. Instead, we use this handy little symbol (%) called a percent sign. Whenever you see this symbol after a number, it means the number is a percent. It’s really a fraction with 100 on the bottom, but it’s just being written in this more compact form. …like this number 15 here. It’s got the percent sign after it, so we read it as “15 percent”, and because a percent is really a fraction that always has 100 as the bottom number, we know that it means the same thing as 15 over 100. Percents make even more sense if you know what the word precent means. The prefix of the word (per) means “for each” or “for every”. Ya know like if someone said, “only one cookie per person”. And the root word (cent) is Latin for 100. That’s why there’s 100 cents in a dollar. So, percent literally means “per 100” and that’s why they’re shortcuts for writing fractions that have 100 as the bottom number. Alright then, so whenever you see a percent like this, you know it can be replaced with (or converted) to a fraction. Let’s look at a few examples so you see the pattern. 3% means 3 over 100 10% means 10 over 100 25% means 25 over 100 and 75% means 75 over 100 These are percents… and these are the fractions that they stand for. There’s a few other interesting percents that we should take a look at. …like this one: 0% …can you have 0% ? Yes! 0% would just mean 0 over 100. It’s what we like to call a “zero fraction” cuz its value is just zero. Remember, it’s okay to have zero on the top of a fraction, but not the bottom! Alright then, what about 100%. Well 100% just means 100 over 100. That’s what we like to call a “whole fraction”. The top number is the same as the bottom, so its value is just one whole, or 1. Okay then, 0% is just zero, and 100% is just 1. But what about numbers bigger than 100? Can you have 126% ? Yep, it works exactly the same way. 126% just means 126 over 100. And you know from the fractions videos, that’s what we call an “improper fraction”. The top number is bigger than the bottom number, so the fraction’s value will be greater than 1. Alright team, I want you to go out there and give me a-hundred and TEN percent effort in today’s game! But coach… it would be “improper” for us to give a-hundred and ten percent effort in today’s game. Okay, so now you know the key to percentages. …that they’re just special fractions that always have 100 as the bottom number. But there’s one more thing that I need to tell you about in this video, and that’s decimals. Do you remember in the video about fractions and decimals that you can convert any fraction into its decimal value? Sometimes it was kind of tricky converting to a decimal if we had to divide the top number by the bottom number. But other times, like when we had “base-10” fractions, it was easy because decimal number places are made for counting base-10 fractions, (like tenths, hundredths and thousandths). Well guess what… Percents ARE base-10 fractions! They are hundredths because their bottom number is always 100. That means it’s really easy to re-write a percentage as a decimal number. You can do it the same way as we did in the base-10 fractions video. For example, we know that 15% is just 15 over 100, right? That’s its fraction form. But it also has the decimal form 0.15 because THIS is the hundredths place and 0.15 means 15 hundredths. So, we can re-write 15% as a fraction (15 over 100) OR as a decimal (0.15) And now that you know WHY we can easily convert a percentage to a decimal, let me show you a really simple trick for doing it. First, you start with the number in percent form like this: 35% Next, you imagine where the decimal point should be in the number 35. It’s not shown, but if it was, it would be right here next to the ones place. (Now remember, 35 and 35.0 are the same value.) Now that you know where the decimal point is, just move it two number places to the left (away from the percent symbol) and draw it in right there. Last of all, once you have moved the decimal point, you erase the percent sign because you don’t have a percent anymore. Moving the decimal point two places to the left converted it into the decimal value of that percent. Let’s try converting a few more percents into their decimal values so you can get the hang of it. For 62 percent, we move the decimal point two places to the left and get 0.62 (Remember, we can put an extra zero in front of the decimal point to be a place holder and to make the decimal point easier to notice.) For 75 percent, we move the decimal point and get 0.75 For 99 percent, we move the decimal point to get 0.99 Pretty Cool, huh? Okay, but what about 4% ? You might wonder how we can move the decimal point two places over when our number only has one digit. But all we need to do is use a zero as a place holder in the number place that’s missing. Then, when we move the decimal point two places over, we end up with the decimal value of 0.04. Now that makes sense because 4 is in the hundredths place and 4% is 4 over 100. And in the same way, 1% would just be 0.01. Again, we need that extra zero placeholder. Here’s a few more interesting examples: 0% would be just 0.00 And if we have 100% and we move the decimal point two places to the left, we end up with 1.00 But 1.00 is the same value as 1. That’s why 100% represent one whole. And if we have 142%, we move the decimal point to get 1.42 That’s a value greater than one which is what we’d expect because 142% is really an improper fraction (142 over 100) Its value should be greater than 1. Alright, so now you know that a percent is a special fraction that always has 100 as the bottom number. And you know that you can re-write percents in either their fraction form OR their decimal form. 25% is 25 over 100 or 0.25 But keep in mind that you could go the other way too. If someone gives you a fraction with 100 as the bottom number, you can re-write it in percent form. If you get 12 over 100, you can say that’s 12% And if you get 80 over 100, you can say that’s 80% OR… If you get the decimal 0.10, you can say that’s 10% and if you get the decimal 0.38, you can say that’s 38% So, that’s the key to percentages. They’re another way to write fractions and decimals. But there’s a lot more to learn about how they‘re used in math, and we’ll learn more about that in the next few videos. But for now, you should be sure that you really understand the basics of percentages by doing the exercises for this section. Thanks for watching Math Antics, and I’ll see ya next time! Learn more at www.mathantics.com

100 thoughts on “Math Antics – What Are Percentages?

  1. รู้จัก Passive Income รึเปล่า ชีวิตจะดีขึ้น 100% 200% 300% เลย

  2. U know Math tactics (I mean antics) is so much easier to learn math with rather than school and this gave me an idea
    That we or most people should learn math on Youtube A.K.A YT
    (I would have been a math genius by now if I studied math on Youtube)
    My math teachers like Maam Sehrish was actually great math teacher
    (I miss her so bad) (WHY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I wish she taught me in every single grade)

  3. This video in percentages- 95% I wish you were my math teacher-4%HeY tHaNkS FoR tHE HeLp-1% who’s watching in 2019

  4. Hi this is roopa from India I liked all your videos am improving a lot just a humble request please upload age related problems n good n tricks for competitive exams

  5. I think the presenter forgot to mention the purpose of percentages. They are to make comparison easy. If not for that, why would we bother?
    Percentages are simplified fractions. And we need them because fractions can be difficult to interpret and compare.
    When 30 out of 45 people said they preferred Macdonald’s and 40 out of 65 people said they preferred KFC which brand has proved most popular? With simple fractions we have to compare thirty forty-fifths with forty sixty-fifths! Which is not always easy!!
    So we convert those fractions into percentages, which are really only fractions with a common denominator of 100 (the number under the line). Making comparison becomes very easy. And that’s why we have percentages!!!!
    To convert a fraction into a percentage divide the top number (the numerator) by the bottom number (the denominator) and multiply by 100.
    So 30 over 45 is .667. And .667 times 100 is 66.7 percent.
    And 40 over 65 is .615. And .615 times 100 is 61.5 percent.
    Macdonald’s wins.
    Also why doesn’t he make it clear that dividing or multiplying by tens, hundreds, thousands etc is easy. You just move the decimal point. Moving one place for ten, two places for 100, three places for a thousand etc etc. Moving the decimal point to the left divides the number and moving to the right multiplies. But instead he tells us what to do without explaining why!!! (Sometimes you have to add one or more zeros to accommodate the calculated number. For example multiply 27 by 100. You imagine a decimal point after the 27 add two naughts to accommodate the new number and hey-presto! The answer is 2700.
    It’s that background information which makes understanding more likely. Why doesn’t he provide it??
    The US and my country Britain are falling behind other cultures because our education standards are abysmal.
    And this video is a good example of what’s wrong.

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    LOL

  7. Can someone please explain me how a % can make something free?
    There's this 100 coupon and someone said 100% coupon instead of saying 100 coupon
    And now they're arguing about how can a percent sign make something free?

  8. I am just grade 4 and i am watching this but my teacher never tesch that😂😂😂i want to be smarter than my smarter classmate😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂

  9. Hi Parents and subscribers, this might help you too!!! Math Tapper is a simple, yet addicting math arcade game where basic equations scroll down the screen, presenting two possible answers. Hope this helps.😎 Apple Store – @t
    Google Play Link – @t​

  10. I really liked this lesson. I don't know about the concept of 'moving the decimal point' though. I have heard that you should teach that you are moving the numbers, not the decimal point.

  11. Hi teacher ! teacher:hi so class pls get your homework and pass it to me:uhhhh….. What do you mean teacher?….

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